Drilling Rigs to Develop Hydrocarbon Deposits in the Arctic Ocean to Be Built in Primorye

Drilling Rigs to Develop Hydrocarbon Deposits in the Arctic Ocean to Be Built in Primorye

Primorye is preparing to construct offshore rigs for the Russian shelf development. Developing petroleum accumulations in the Arctic Ocean beginning in the near future was the topic of the meeting between Russian President Vladimir Putin and NK Rosneft Chairman of the Board Igor Sechin. Russian Federation President’ Web site at kremlin.ru says Igor Sechin promised Vladimir Putin that the rigs will be built in Russia, particularly in Primorye.
“Mr. President, our agreements with the strategic partners envision 70% local equipment purchases in the area of the Russian Federation. In Vladivostok, in your presence, we signed an agreement on the construction of the production rigs in Primorye with our Far Eastern shipbuilders,” Igor Sechin reminded the head of the state. “Surely, we will insistently carry out this work.”
“I very much expect that the orders to be performed by the companies will be, to a large extent, oriented toward Russian shipbuilding,” Vladimir Putin pointed out.
By this day, the VOSTCO offshore structures construction yard in Primorye, in Vrangel bay, has successfully built three support structures for production platforms. The latest platform was delivered to the client ExxonMobil in August 2012. The concrete gravity base structure for the Berkut platform—the largest built in Russia—was installed by the coast of Sakhalin. Resource production will begin in two years. Through successful completion of this project, the Primorye professionals gained invaluable experience in offshore rigs construction. Furthermore, Far Eastern Shipbuilding and Ship Repair Center is constructing the Zvezda Shipbuilding Complex in Bolshoi Kamen Bay designed to produce ice strengthened vessels and offshore rig parts.
“Erection of the cutting edge shipyard will allow establishing effective and profitable production of the complete range of the required offshore structures. If the Arctic development projects roll out in the scope currently planned (I’m referring, in particular, to the fields in the area of the Kara Sea) our production capacities in Bolshoi Kamen may not be sufficient. As the shipyard capacity (the quantity of metal processed annually) after the completion of the second stage will be 45 thousand tons, after the completion of the third stage 90 thousand tons. It is not that much indeed—only five or six large ships by tonnage a year. But they will also require offshore structures. To address this issue a technical design of a specialized offshore yard in Pyat Okhotnikov (Five Hunters’) Bay (50 km away from Bolshoi Kamen) was developed that will, in the long term, further enable nearly doubling the capacity,” Yury Filchenok, Deputy Director of Far Eastern Shipbuilding and Ship Repair Center, told. “This shipyard will become the fourth stage of the Zvezda Shipbuilding Complex construction. And the start and end of the closing construction will largely depend upon the time frame for development of the largest fields of the Arctic sector of the Russian Federation.”